Section.80 : Product Of The Ronald Reagan Era

In 2011 Kendrick Lamar was not as known to the world as he would be once he released his first major label debut album good kid, m.A.A.d city in 2012. But Section.80 is just as good of an album as GKMC. Section.80 shows how to master the art of an conceptual album and shows the mentality of kids alike Lamar that were born in the Ronald Reagan Era.

  

“Fire burning inside my eyes, this the music that saved my life y’all be calling it Hip-Hop I be calling it hypnotize.” Kendrick starts off the album with that strong statement from Fuck Your Ethnicity. Lamar then transitions into the upbeat Hol’ Up were “losing ain’t an option” for Lamar. Then the amazing “fuck that” song that explains how drugs effect the Section.80 babies, A.D.H.D.  No Make-Up shows the vice of then unknown prostitute Keisha that is continued in the 11th song. 

  

Failed relationships that eventually led Tammy to “turn dyke” shows the situation in Tammy Song (Her Evils). The evils of Tammy are not rare, some women do switch to women when they can’t find a man that they can sustain a healthy relationship with. The soothing interlude Chapter Six shows the level of hopelessness of Section.80 babies, “young, wild, & reckless is how we live life, pray that we make it to 21.” Ronald Reagan Era is hands down one of the best songs on the album perfectly explains the mindset of people of that era. “We’re far from good not good from far, 90 mph down Compton Blvd. With the top down screaming we don’t give a fuck, drink my 40 ounce of freedom while I roll my blount cuz the kids just ain’t alright.” In the next track Lamar explains the vices of people he knows, his father, and uncles alike in Poe Mans Dreams (His Vice). Kendrick wants to become successful so his father and uncles can “smoke good, eat good, live good”.

  

In the track The Spiteful Chant, Lamar and labelmate ScHoolBoy Q tackle the issue of fake people who “smile in my face but talk behind my back everytime I’m gone.” The scond interlude on the album transitions into the amazing and painful story of Keisha. “Lord kniws the usuals leaving her body sore”, Lamar explains the struggles of the prostitue in Keisha’s Song (Her Pain). This song is easily one the best tracks on the album with lines like, “she hit the back seat cuz Rosa Parks never a factor when she making ends meet”. “You can blame her mother for letting her boyfriend slide candy her covers 10 months before she 10 he moved then he touched her, this motherfucker is the fucking reason why Keisha rushing to that block away from Louis Park.” After the painful but beautifully told story Keisha, Kendrick delivers the quickly spoken lyrics of Rigamortus. Rigamortus has easily the best flow from Lamar, proclaims he killed your favorite rapper with, “he dead I killed em.”

  

With some help from BJ The Chicago Kid on the track Kush & Corinthians (His Pain), Kendrick rhymes over a soothing beat about themes of morality, drugs, & religion. Over an Aaliyah sample Lamar raps about fake people inside & outside the industry, and repeats “R.I.P. Aaliyah R.I.P.” On the next track Lamar shines the spotlight on TDE labelmate Ab-Soul for Ab-Soul’s Outro. Ab-Soul absolutely doesn’t dissappoint with his verses with lines like “Is you gonna live on your knees or die on your feet, take out that student loan & pay off your college degree & do exactly what you see on tv.” On the last track on Section.80 Kendrick spits over the J. Cole produced beat, HiiiPoWeR. Lamar defines the absolute definition of how to make an impactful song. “Why you motherfuckers waiting, I’ll be off the slaveship, building pryramids, writing my own hieroglyphs.”

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